distract from

divert attention from, sidetrack

English contemporary dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • distract — v. (D; tr.) to distract from (the music distracted them from their studies) * * * [dɪs trækt] (D; tr.) to distract from (the music distracted them from their studies) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • distract (someone's) attention from something — distract (someone’s) attention from something phrase to do something in order to stop someone from paying attention to something They tried to distract attention from the crisis. Thesaurus: to make someone unable to concentrate or think… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Distract — Dis*tract , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distracted}, old p. p. {Distraught}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distracting}.] 1. To draw apart or away; to divide; to disjoin. [1913 Webster] A city . . . distracted from itself. Fuller. [1913 Webster] 2. To draw (the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • distract — mid 14c., to draw asunder or apart, to turn aside (literal and figurative), from L. distractus, pp. of distrahere draw in different directions, from dis away (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + trahere to draw (see TRACT (Cf. tract) (1)). Sense of to throw… …   Etymology dictionary

  • distract — ► VERB 1) prevent (someone) from giving their full attention to something. 2) divert (attention) from something. DERIVATIVES distracted adjective distracting adjective. ORIGIN Latin distrahere draw apart …   English terms dictionary

  • From Time to Time (novel) — From Time to Time is a 1995 illustrated novel by Jack Finney, the sequel to Time and Again , which tells the story of how Simon Morley, working on a secret government project in 1970, was able to travel back in time to the New York City of… …   Wikipedia

  • distract */ — UK [dɪˈstrækt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms distract : present tense I/you/we/they distract he/she/it distracts present participle distracting past tense distracted past participle distracted to get someone s attention and prevent them from… …   English dictionary

  • distract — detract, distract Both words are used transitively (with an object) followed by from; but their meanings are different. Detract, which (more than distract) is also used without an object, means ‘to take away (a part of something), to diminish’: • …   Modern English usage

  • distract — dis|tract [ dı strækt ] verb transitive * to get someone s attention and prevent them from concentrating on something: She was distracted by the sound of running water. distract someone from something: We must let nothing distract us from our… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • distract — dis|tract [dıˈstrækt] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: distractus, past participle of distrahere to pull apart ] to take someone s attention away from something by making them look at or listen to something else ▪ Try not to distract the… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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